The course module addresses the impacts of globalization on women’s and children’s health. It will present both the positive and negative impacts of globalization on women's and children’s health, including the unequal distribution of some of the effects of globalization among different groups of women and children. The course will demonstrate the need for a rights based approach to development, global health diplomacy, as well as gender-equity-oriented macroeconomic, trade, and labor market policies

Lectures and class exercises in this course will cover  the following topics:

  • What is globalization and what are the key debates about globalization relating to the health sector?
  • What is the relationship between economic growth and health status  in the era of globalization?
  • Public health and globalization:
    • the health status of women and children globally;
    • women’s and children’s  health status and human development;
    • the concept of ‘social determinants of health’, focusing on those determinants pertaining to   women’s and children’s health status in  developing countries; and
    • the impacts of globalization on the social determinants of health of women and
    • children in developing countries.
  • The consequences of globalization on the health of women and children in relation to:
    • communicable diseases;
    • lifestyle and behaviour changes;
    • environmental threats;
    • household income; and
    • marginalized and vulnerable populations.
  • Monitoring the impacts of globalization on the health status of women and children. 
  • Health systems and globalization:  
    • health care systems as a social determinant of health;  
    • policy makers and policy making at the global level; and  
    • the global health  care system funding architecture.
  • International responses to globalization through global health policies and legislation by:  
    • o  international financial and trade  institutions (i.e.: IMF, World Bank, ADB, WTO.)
    • o  international health and development institutions  (i.e. WHO, UNAIDS, UNICEF, UNFPA, UNDP)
  • Globalization and the implementation of a rights based approach to development, global health diplomacy, gender-equity-oriented macroeconomic